Grade can be found by measuring the horizontal length of an elevation, the run, and the vertical height of the elevation, the rise. How to Find Grade of an Elevation. This is the maxim used by climbers. Grade is expressed as rise/run, so if the rise is 25 and the run is 80 the grade is 25/80. In my opinion the primary factor that affects effort is the amount of elevation gain. Every 100 feet of elevation gain slows you 6.6% of your average one mile pace (2% grade/mile). Additionally, this section of the trail on the overall ascent that goes down 250 feet subsequently goes up on the descent, so it is counted as another gain in elevation. If you go above 10,000 feet (3,048 meters), only increase your altitude by 1,000 feet (305 meters) per day and for every 3,000 feet (915 meters) of elevation gained, take a rest day. This is an ideal ratio that makes sure the elevation gain is in line with other parameters. The generally agreed upon ratio used to describe a route with a substantial amount of climbing is 100 feet per mile or 1,000 feet for every 10 miles. Take your 3,000 feet of gain and divide that by 5. Therefore the hiking effort was 11.6 + 2.3, or 13.9 miles. Why didn’t we divvy that up by 10 miles? You should come up with 600 feet of elevation gain per mile. The empirical correction I use is 1 mile per 1000 feet of elevation gain. Again, this desaturation of oxygen from the blood and brain is what kicks on the adaptive response in the body, and by incrementally introducing the stimulus, users at sea-level can arrive at real altitude with little to no ill-effects. Use the below grade percent incline and downgrade calculator to estimate the actual vertical distance change in feet if you know the grade percentage value and the horizontal distance. The rule of thumb out there for elevation gain is that 1000 ft gained vertically is roughly equivalent to 1 mile horizontally. Example: A race that climbs 300 feet would slow an 8 … I've seen research out there that backs it up with a few caveats, such as sex, body type, load, terrain, etc. For a specific example, my most recent hike on the Bay Area Ridge Trail was 11.6 miles with 2250 feet of elevation gain. Grasping the concept of elevation gain and the ratio of climbs to flat terrain will help you both physically and mentally prepare for a day in the mountains. He sought trails that averaged at least 1,000 feet in elevation gain per mile. Calculating grade and steepness change in feet are good for the calculation of inclined planes in mountain areas. A good elevation gain that describes an acceptable route has a climbing of 100 feet per mile or 1000 feet every 10 miles. The number of miles in a hike goes hand in hand with the amount of elevation gain. Our chart will help you find the oxygen levels by elevation for many common altitudes. 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